Policy Tools

Nutrition Policy Tools

Below are a number of resources, toolkits, and model policies to use as you develop your own worksite policy related to nutrition. CDC’s Healthy Food Service Guidelines is a gold standard resource that can be used when developing your own nutrition policies in your worksite. These guidelines provide information to show why providing healthy choices is recommended and how to enable sustainable choices in the workplace, including worksites and hospitals. The guidelines address vending machines, meeting and event, sodium reduction, and improving the overall food environment in your workplace.

Vending

Healthy Vending is a good place to start when considering a more healthy work environment. Encourage your employer to have healthy options in your vending machines. Some examples include, yogurt, apples, string cheese, pre-packaged sandwiches, and granola bars. Reduce the availability of candy, chips, and other less nutritious choices. The following resources provide guidance on vending machine guidelines and policy:

  • General Services Administration and Department of Health and Human Services with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collaborated to create the Federal Service Guidelines for Federal Facilities to assist contractors in increasing healthy food and beverage choices and sustainable practices at federal worksites. It also helps worksites align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015.
  • Step by step instructions on how to work with second party vendors, and other state initiatives, review the Healthier Vending Machine Initiatives in State Facilities.
  • Public Health Law Center provides a great resource for implementing food procurement and vending policies.
  • Nutritional Environment Measures Survey-Vending (NEMS-V) has a calculator that will allow your institution to re-evaluate the nutritional value of items offered from the vending machine. Here is a link to the tutorial on how to use the calculator.
Meetings

Often work meetings are catered or food is provided to employees. Do what you can to encourage your employer to provide healthy food options and appropriate portion sizes. Opt for sandwiches, veggie trays, salads and soups instead of fried chicken or pastries.

Model Policies and Toolkits

Whether you are seeking to create a policy from scratch or assess the effectiveness of your policy, looking at what other organizations have implemented will be helpful for you. These resources will provide guidance when developing, adopting, implementing and evaluating a food policy specific for your organization.

Other Resources

Physical Activity Policy Tools

Below are a number of resources to use as you develop your own worksite policy related to physical activity.

Diabetes Policy Tools

Below are a number of resources to use as you develop your own worksite policy related to diabetes.

Tobacco Policy Tools

Below is a list of toolkits and resources available to assist you in development of a tobacco policy at your worksite:

Breastfeeding Policy Tools

Below are a number of resources, toolkits, and model policies to use as you develop your own worksite policy related to breastfeeding. Creating workplace policies and programs for breastfeeding will help create a more breastfeeding-friendly environment and increase the number of women who choose to breastfeed at work. For more information about creating a policy for your workplace, visit:

Policy Models and Toolkits

Examples of other states work:

Cancer Policy Tools

Below are a number of resources to use as you develop your own worksite policy related to cancer.

Model Policies

Worksite wellness programs have been developed and implemented by many companies and organizations. Below are highlights from some major health organizations with programs that are recommended for companies looking to incorporate health into their business.

  • The Partnership for Prevention has created the Healthy Workforce 2010 and Beyond booklet that provides details about worksite wellness and what needs to be done in a company to have a successful program.
  • The National Healthy Worksite Program provides employers with the tools to implement evidence-based worksite wellness programs to reduce chronic disease rates. The goal of this program is prevention and its role in reducing chronic disease and disability, as well as improving productivity outcomes to increase employers' competitiveness.
  • The Partnership for Prevention has a program called, Leading by Example. This program is for senior management and CEOs to learn about the benefits of worksite wellness programs. This program provides information on how CEOs can encourage healthy activities in their companies, and also features several real companies that have used this program and implemented worksite wellness programs.
  • The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) created the Total Worker Health program to guide employers intending to establish effective worksite wellness programs in order to improve worker health. The program provides resources on how to create a comprehensive worksite wellness program.
  • Boeing was featured as an example worksite for their wellness program.